Section 1 Reading 阅读部分

  Passage 1 Literature 小说类

  文章选自《简爱》第十一章开头4段。

  文章大意:主角刚担任家庭教师时对主人家庭的描述和感受,以及她对自己生命的更深的期待。

  SAT考情解密

  阅读原文还原:

  The promise of a smooth career, which my first calm introduction to Thornfield Hall seemed to pledge, was not belied on a longer acquaintance with the place and its inmates. Mrs. Fairfax turned out to be what she appeared, a placid-tempered, kind-natured woman, of competent education and average intelligence. My pupil was a lively child, who had been spoilt and indulged, and therefore was sometimes wayward; but as she was committed entirely to my care, and no injudicious interference from any quarter ever thwarted my plans for her improvement, she soon forgot her little freaks, and became obedient and teachable. She had no great talents, no marked traits of character, no peculiar development of feeling or taste which raised her one inch above the ordinary level of childhood; but neither had she any deficiency or vice which sunk her below it. She made reasonable progress, entertained for me a vivacious, though perhaps not very profound, affection,and by her simplicity, gay prattle, and efforts to please, inspired me, in return, with a degree of attachment sufficient to make us both content in each other‘s society.

  This, par parenthèse, will be thought cool language by persons who entertain solemn doctrines about the angelic nature of children, and the duty of those charged with their education to conceive for them an idolatrous devotion: but I am not writing to flatter parental egotism, to echo cant, or prop up humbug; I am merely telling the truth. I felt a conscientious solicitude for Adèle‘s welfare and progress, and a quiet liking for her little self: just as I cherished towards Mrs. Fairfax a thankfulness for her kindness, and a pleasure in her society proportionate to the tranquil regard she had for me, and the moderation of her mind and character.

  Anybody may blame me who likes, when I add further, that, now and then, when I took a walk by myself in the grounds; when I went down to the gates and looked through them along the road; or when, while Adèle played with her nurse, and Mrs. Fairfax made jellies in the storeroom, I climbed the three staircases, raised the trap-door of the attic, and having reached the leads, looked out afar over sequestered field and hill, and along dim sky-line—that then I longed for a power of vision which might overpass that limit; which might reach the busy world, towns, regions full of life I had heard of but never seen—that then I desired more of practical experience than I possessed; more of intercourse with my kind, of acquaintance with variety of character, than was here within my reach. I valued what was good in Mrs. Fairfax, and what was good in Adèle; but I believed in the existence of other and more vivid kinds of goodness, and what I believed in I wished to behold.

  Who blames me? Many, no doubt; and I shall be called discontented. I could not help it: the restlessness was in my nature; it agitated me to pain sometimes. Then my sole relief was to walk along the corridor of the third storey, backwards and forwards, safe in the silence and solitude of the spot, and allow my mind‘s eye to dwell on whatever bright visions rose before it—and, certainly, they were many and glowing; to let my heart be heaved by the exultant movement, which, while it swelled it in trouble, expanded it with life; and, best of all, to open my inward ear to a tale that was never ended—a tale my imagination created, and narrated continuously; quickened with all of incident, life, fire, feeling, that I desired and had not in my actual existence.

  Passage 2 History 历史类

  文章选自Thomas Paine在1776年发表的《Common Sense》。

  文章大意:有些人觉得我们(美国人)跟英国有天然联系,而作者观点认为英国和我们的关系是剥削压迫的关系,并不是mother country的关系 应该切断和英国的联系。

  阅读原文还原:

  I have heard it asserted by some, that as America has flourished under her former connection with Great Britain, the same connection is necessary towards her future happiness, and will always have the same effect. Nothing can be more fallacious than this kind of argument. We may as well assert that because a child has thrived upon milk, that it is never to have meat, or that the first twenty years of our lives is to become a precedent for the next twenty. But even this is admitting more than is true; for I answer roundly that America would have flourished as much, and probably much more, had no European power taken any notice of her. The commerce by which she hath enriched herself are the necessaries of life, and will always have a market while eating is the custom of Europe.

  But she has protected us, say some. That she hath engrossed us is true, and defended the Continent at our expense as well as her own, is admitted; and she would have defended Turkey from the same motive, viz. — for the sake of trade and dominion.

  Alas! we have been long led away by ancient prejudices and made large sacrifices to superstition. We have boasted the protection of Great Britain, without considering, that her motive was INTEREST not ATTACHMENT; and that she did not protect us from OUR ENEMIES on OUR ACCOUNT; but from HER ENEMIES on HER OWN ACCOUNT, from those who had no quarrel with us on any OTHER ACCOUNT, and who will always be our enemies on the SAME ACCOUNT. Let Britain waive her pretensions to the Continent, or the Continent throw off the dependence, and we should be at peace with France and Spain, were they at war with Britain. The miseries of Hanover last war ought to warn us against connections.

  It hath lately been asserted in parliament, that the Colonies have no relation to each other but through the Parent Country, i.e. that Pennsylvania and the Jerseys and so on for the rest, are sister Colonies by the way of England; this is certainly a very roundabout way of proving relationship, but it is the nearest and only true way of proving enmity (or enemyship, if I may so call it.) France and Spain never were, nor perhaps ever will be, our enemies as AMERICANS, but as our being the SUBJECTS OF GREAT BRITAIN.

  But Britain is the parent country, say some. Then the more shame upon her conduct. Even brutes do not devour their young, nor savages make war upon their families. Wherefore, the assertion, if true, turns to her reproach; but it happens not to be true, or only partly so, and the phrase PARENT OR MOTHER COUNTRY hath been jesuitically adopted by the King and his parasites, with a low papistical design of gaining an unfair bias on the credulous weakness of our minds. Europe, and not England, is the parent country of America. This new World hath been the asylum for the persecuted lovers of civil and religious liberty from EVERY PART of Europe. Hither have they fled, not from the tender embraces of the mother, but from the cruelty of the monster; and it is so far true of England, that the same tyranny which drove the first emigrants from home, pursues their descendants still.

  Passage 3 Science 自然科学类

  文章大意:气候变化climate change导致气温下降,进而导致侵蚀 erosion加剧。

  Passage 4 Social Studies 社会科学类

  文章大意:技术的创新,论述城市企业的创新比非城市的好。开篇首先是对创新 / innovation的定义:人们认为专利 / patent就是创新,其实创新应该分为product和process两种,前者是完全的自主创新或者把他人想法融合的创新,后者则是相互沟通的结果。而由于城市企业有更多的人员流动,因此容易产生创新。

  Passage 5 Science 自然科学类(双篇对比阅读)

  文章大意:关于carnivore explosion。第一篇讲为什么carnivore的大量出现会和之前某个时期有gap,S科学家做实验并得出结论,是因为oxygen的存在让carnivore出现。但是最后一段B提出异议,他认为两者的因果关系S搞反了,而lack of oxygen并不会很影响当时的物种。第二篇和第一篇对立,第二篇认为carnivore之所以被认为晚出现是因为那个时期的fossil不能很好保存,和oxygen无关。

  Section 2 Writing and Language Use 文法部分

  Passage 1 The Elinton Event 科学类

  文章大意:讲述的是太阳黑子现象对于磁场的影响;大致描述了1859年的某一天发生的 solar storm 带来的影响以及提醒未来要做好应对措施,跟维基百科上描述solar storm of 1859的那篇文章内容有较多相似。本篇考时态、增减题、逻辑连接词选择、标点、过渡句选择、合句题等。

  Passage 2 A Matter of Degrees 人文类

  文章大意:讲述的是体育特长大学生的境况;讲职业运动员在上完大学之后去走职业发展这条路虽然不多,但是读大学是对他们是有影响的,开拓眼界,帮助他们选择自己之后人生的道路。

  其中,第一题考到了比较简单的主谓一致。总体难度比上一次考试会难一些,出现了一个句子多处划线,并出现了三个句子划线的合句题。图表题,运动员读完大学之后走职业发展这条路的数据,男的 basketball player 的比例1.1%,女的0.9%,图表题难度不大,把数字和项目看懂就可以做出题目。词汇部分考到了 complication,nuisance等单词。

  Passage 3 Solitude in a Crowd 人文类

  文章大意:讲述的是一个照相师的作品的发布;内容主要讲的是一个摄影师的作品,开头段由一个在subway背景下的孤独的女人的作品引出,这幅是他的一本作品中的80多幅作品中的其中一幅,其他作品大基本都是偷拍了人群中孤独的人,他有一本书当时一直未成功出版因为当时出版商少,在很多年之后作品出版了,证实了他拍得确实很有价值。题型包含有时态、标点、句子结构之等。

  Passage 4 Robot 科学类

  文章大意:讲述的是人工机器人设计的越来越像人类的原因和担忧。讲跟真人仿真度高的机器人。首段是讲传统机器人在工业及科学的应用。传统机器人基本外形跟人不像,但现在有一种生产研究仿真忍堵很高的机器人。然后开始说在各个领域这种机器人的好处和需求,但是人们会比较反感或害怕跟真人很像的机器人,有若干原因。题目部分,考查到了标点、从句、逻辑关系、合句、词汇等题型,其中合句和词汇稍有难度。

  Section 3&4 Maths 数学部分

  数学的知识点包括:运算,因数,分数,百分数,比率,一次函数,线性函数,二次方程,指数函数,幂函数,其中出现了三角函数的图像。

  具体涉及:

  1.一次方程的解方程,应用题

  2.二次方程的解方程,应用题

  3.数形结合(一次和二次图像的分析),分析图像走势,斜率,截距,顶点之类。

  4.图表问题,分析数据(主要是用数字加减乘除),包括求平均数,中位数,众数。

  5.实验样本选取,推理题

  6.几何(平面、立体)特别是圆,三角形。

  7.三角函数和虚数

  8.代数计算题,单位换算。

  Section 5 Essay 写作部分

  ▼篇章内容▼

  SAT写作阅读原文出自《纽约时报》:

  //www.nytimes.com/2014/05/13/opinion/bruni-read-kids-read.html

  写作部分的阅读原文:

  As an uncle I’m inconsistent about too many things.

  Birthdays, for example. My nephew Mark had one on Sunday, and I didn’t remember — and send a text — until 10 p.m., by which point he was asleep.

  School productions, too. I saw my niece Bella in “Seussical: The Musical” but missed “The Wiz.” She played Toto, a feat of trans-species transmogrification that not even Meryl, with all of her accents, has pulled off.

  But about books, I’m steady. Relentless. I’m incessantly asking my nephews and nieces what they’re reading and why they’re not reading more. I’m reliably hurling novels at them, and also at friends’ kids. I may well be responsible for 10 percent of all sales of “The Fault in Our Stars,” a teenage love story to be released as a movie next month. Never have I spent money with fewer regrets, because I believe in reading — not just in its power to transport but in its power to transform.

  So I was crestfallen on Monday, when a new report by Common Sense Media came out. It showed that 30 years ago, only 8 percent of 13-year-olds and 9 percent of 17-year-olds said that they “hardly ever” or never read for pleasure. Today, 22 percent of 13-year-olds and 27 percent of 17-year-olds say that. Fewer than 20 percent of 17-year-olds now read for pleasure “almost every day.” Back in 1984, 31 percent did. What a marked and depressing change.

  I know, I know: This sounds like a fogy’s crotchety lament. Or, worse, like self-interest. Professional writers arguing for vigorous reading are dinosaurs begging for a last breath. We’re panhandlers with a better vocabulary.

  But I’m coming at this differently, as someone persuaded that reading does things — to the brain, heart and spirit — that movies, television, video games and the rest of it cannot.

  There’s research on this, and it’s cited in a recent article in The Guardian by Dan Hurley, who wrote that after “three years interviewing psychologists and neuroscientists around the world,” he’d concluded that “reading and intelligence have a relationship so close as to be symbiotic.”

  In terms of smarts and success, is reading causative or merely correlated? Which comes first, “The Hardy Boys” or the hardy mind? That’s difficult to unravel, but several studies have suggested that people who read fiction, reveling in its analysis of character and motivation, are more adept at reading people, too: at sizing up the social whirl around them. They’re more empathetic. God knows we need that.

  Late last year, neuroscientists at Emory University reported enhanced neural activity in people who’d been given a regular course of daily reading, which seemed to jog the brain: to raise its game, if you will.

  Some experts have doubts about that experiment’s methodology, but I’m struck by how its findings track something that my friends and I often discuss. If we spend our last hours or minutes of the night reading rather than watching television, we wake the next morning with thoughts less jumbled, moods less jangled. Reading has bequeathed what meditation promises. It has smoothed and focused us.

  Maybe that’s about the quiet of reading, the pace of it. At Success Academy Charter Schools in New York City, whose students significantly outperform most peers statewide, the youngest kids all learn and play chess, in part because it hones “the ability to focus and concentrate,” said Sean O’Hanlon, who supervises the program. Doesn’t reading do the same?

  Daniel Willingham, a psychology professor at the University of Virginia, framed it as a potentially crucial corrective to the rapid metabolism and sensory overload of digital technology. He told me that it can demonstrate to kids that there’s payoff in “doing something taxing, in delayed gratification.” A new book of his, “Raising Kids Who Read,” will be published later this year.

  Before talking with him, I arranged a conference call with David Levithan and Amanda Maciel. Both have written fiction in the young adult genre, whose current robustness is cause to rejoice, and they rightly noted that the intensity of the connection that a person feels to a favorite novel, with which he or she spends eight or 10 or 20 hours, is unlike any response to a movie.

  That observation brought to mind a moment in “The Fault in Our Stars” when one of the protagonists says that sometimes, “You read a book and it fills you with this weird evangelical zeal, and you become convinced that the shattered world will never be put back together unless and until all living humans read the book.”

  Books are personal, passionate. They stir emotions and spark thoughts in a manner all their own, and I’m convinced that the shattered world has less hope for repair if reading becomes an ever smaller part of it.

展开显示全文