GMAT备考中,语法知识也是大家复习的重点,但是有些语法知识,理解起来比较困难,因此我们将这部分的内容进行了详细的解析,便于大家更好地理解和应用,下面小编为大家整理了详细的内容,供大家参考,希望对大家的语法知识储备有更好地帮助。

  1.Like many self-taught artists, Perle Hessing did not begin to paint until she was well into middle age.

  (A) Like

  (B) As have

  (C) Just as with

  (D) Just like(A)

  (E) As did

  Choice A, the best answer, is concise and grammatically correct, using the comparative preposition like to express the comparison between many self-taught artists and Perle Hessing. Choices B and E, which replace A’s prepositional phrase with clauses introduced by as, use auxiliary verbs that cannot properly be completed by any part of the verb phrase in the main clause: neither have... did not begin nor did... did not begin is logically or grammatically sound. In C and D, Just as with and Just like are both unnecessary wordy.

  2. Like Auden, the language of James Merrill is chatty, arch, and conversational—given to complex syntactic flights as well as to prosaic free-verse strolls.

  (A) Like Auden, the language of James Merrill

  (B) Like Auden, James Merrill’s language

  (C) Like Auden’s, James Merrill’s language

  (D) As with Auden, James Merrill’s language(C)

  (E) As is Auden’s the language of James Merrill

  At issue is a comparison of Auden’s language with Merrill’s language. Only C, the best choice, uses the elliptical like Auden’s (language being understood), to compare Auden’s language with Merrill’s language. A, B, and D compare Auden (the person) with Merrill’s language. Choice E is awkward and unidiomatic.

  3. Like their male counterparts, women scientists are above average in terms of intelligence and creativity, but unlike men of science, their female counterparts have had to work against the grain of occupational stereotyping to enter a “man’s world.”

  (A) their female counterparts have had to work

  (B) their problem is working

  (C) one thing they have had to do is work

  (D) the handicap women of science have had is to work(E)

  (E) women of science have had to work

  E is the best choice. The meaning is clear despite the relative complexity of the sentence, the comparison of women with men is logical, and parallelism is maintained throughout. In A, the construction unlike men of science, their female counterparts violates rules of parallelism and syntax. It would best be rendered as unlike men of science, women of science.... Choice B incorrectly suggests that a comparison is being made between men of science and a. problem faced by female scientists. In C, the lengthy separation between women and they makes the pronoun reference vague, and the comparison between men of science and one thing (rather than women of science) is faulty. The phrasing is unnecessarily wordy as well. Choice D introduces unnecessary redundancy and awkwardness with the construction the handicap women... have had is to work. Choice D also incorrectly compares male scientists with a handicap faced by female scientists.

  4. Like Rousseau, Tolstoi rebelled against the unnatural complexity of human relations in modern society.

  (A) Like Rousseau, Tolstoi rebelled

  (B) Like Rousseau, Tolstoi’s rebellion was

  (C) As Rousseau, Tolstoi rebelled

  (D) As did Rousseau, Tolstoi’s rebellion was(A)

  (E) Tolstoi’s rebellion, as Rousseau’s, was

  In choice A, the best answer, a clear and logical comparison is made between Rousseau and Tolstoi. Choice B illogically compares a person, Rousseau, to an event, Tolstoi’s rebellion. Also, Tolstoi’s rebellion was against is less direct than Tolstoi rebelled against. Inserting did after As would make C grammatical. Because As is a conjunction, it must introduce a clause; hence the noun Rousseau must have a verb. Choice D compares an implied action (As did Rousseau) with a noun (Tolstoi’s rebellion). Choice E is awkwardly formed, and like is needed in place of as to compare two nouns (rebellion is understood after Rousseau’s). Also, Tolstoi’s rebellion... was against is less direct than Tolstoi rebelled against.

  5. Like the one reputed to live in Loch Ness, also an inland lake connected to the ocean by a river, inhabitants of the area around Lake Champlain claim sightings of a long and narrow “sea monster.”

  (A) Like the one reputed to live in Loch Ness, also an inland lake connected to the ocean by a river, inhabitants of the area around Lake Champlain claim sightings of a long and narrow “sea monster.

  (B) Inhabitants of the area around Lake Champlain claim sightings of a long and narrow “sea monster” similar to the one reputed to live in Loch Ness, which, like Lake Champlain, is an inland lake connected to the ocean by a river.

  (C) Inhabitants of the area around Lake Champlain claim sightings of a long and narrow “sea monster” similar to Loch Ness’s, which, like Lake Champlain, is an inland lake connected to the ocean by a river.

  (D) Like Loch Ness’ reputed monster, inhabitants of the area around Lake Champlain, also an inland lake connected to the ocean by a river, claim sightings of a long and narrow “sea monster.”(B)

  (E) Similar to that reputed to live in Loch Ness, inhabitants of the area around Lake Champlain, also an inland lake connected to the ocean by a river, claim sightings of a long and narrow “sea monster.”

  Choice A, D and E illogically compare the monster reputed to live in Loch Ness to the inhabitants of the area around Lake Champlain, not to the monster that some local inhabitants claim to have sighted. Furthermore, in E the phrase Similar to that reputed to live in Loch Ness is needlessly wordy and indirect. C is faulty because the pronoun which would refer to Loch Ness, not to the “sea monster” similar to Loch Ness’s. B, the best choice, uses which correctly and makes a logical comparison. The question is a little easier than middle difficulty.

  6. Like Byron at Missolonghi, Jack London was slowly killed by the mistakes of the medical men who treated him.

  (A) Like Byron

  (B) Like Byron’s death

  (C) Just as Byron died

  (D) Similar to Byron(A)

  (E) As did Byron

  Choice A correctly compares two persons, Byron and Jack London. Choice B illogically compares Byron’s death to London. Choice C does not compare one person to another and could be read as saying Just at the time that Byron died. Choice D misstates the idea: the point is not that London was similar to Byron but that he was like Byron in the manner of his death. In choice E, did cannot grammatically be substituted for was in the phrase was slowly killed. This question is a little more difficult than the average.

  以上就是关于“GMAT语法OG重要知识点解析”的内容,希望通过上述内容的学习,让大家更好地备考考试,小编在这里预祝大家在考试中有更好的发挥,拿到高分成绩,如果大家在备考中有什么疑问,也可以咨询我们的在线老师哟~~~

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